KONGOS w/ Mother Mother

Soda Jerk Presents

KONGOS w/ Mother Mother

Mother Mother

Thu, May 11, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

GA: $22 - $25 //// VIP Packages Available

This event is 16 and over

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VIP PACKAGES ON SALE - KONGOS

There are several VIP Packages that are available for purchase.  Additional info in regard to these packages can be found on the KONGOS event page on the Soda Jerk site.

CLICK HERE FOR ADDITIONAL INFO IN REGARD TO VIP PACKAGES THAT ARE BEING OFFERED.

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KONGOS
KONGOS
The brothers KONGOS -- multi-cultural, multi-faceted, multi-instrumentalists -- craft a unique and irresistible sound spawned from shared DNA, diverse influences and spot-on melodic and lyrical sensibilities. On "Lunatic," their 12-song Epic Records debut, the band's talent shines on "Come With Me Now"; the title an impossible-to-resist aural summons, the rock-alt crossover tune kicking off with the accordion, jumping into foot-stomping, staccato rhythms, slide guitar, and soaring epic soundscapes reminiscent of U2. "I'm Only Joking," whose lyrics hint at the album's title, hits the mark with decisive tribal rhythms and Pink Floyd-esque mysterious modern rock. Thanks to an earlier self-release of "Lunatic," KONGOS are already stars overseas, playing their numerous hits off "Lunatic" for crowds of up to 65,000 at South African festivals and touring the Republic with Linkin Park, and the UK and Europe with AWOLNATION and Dispatch. With a Feb-March North American tour with Airborne Toxic Event and alternative and rock radio hot on "Come With Me Now" and "I'm Only Joking," (not to mention "Come With Me Now" in promos for NFL, NBA and ESPN), 2014 is quickly shaping up as the year the U.S. catches KONGOS fever.

KONGOS' life story is as cinematic and captivating as their songs. The siblings, who range in age from 25 (Danny) to 32 (Johnny), were born to popular '70s South African/ British singer-songwriter John Kongos ("He's Gonna Step On You Again," "Tokoloshe Man"). Spending their early childhood in London (all were born there except Danny), then South Africa before settling in Phoenix in the mid-90s, the boys were exposed to a wide variety of sounds. "We listened to everything from classical and opera like Puccini to African tribal music to 60s and 70s pop and rock," says Dylan, who cites African bassist Richard Bona, Béla Fleck's Victor Wooten, and singing players like Sting and Paul McCartney as influences. His rhythm section partner, Jesse, who studied Jazz at ASU (as did Johnny), remembers learning boogie-woogie and classical piano as a child before getting into African drums, then jazz greats like Jack DeJohnette. As KONGOS grew together as a rock band, Jesse loved the vibe and feel of Zeppelin's John Bonham, and currently admires gospel and hip hop drummers like Aaron Spears and Carlos McSwain. Danny also boasts a myriad of influences, ranging from Jeff Beck to Mahmoud Ahmed -- "the James Brown of Ethiopia" -- for his use of unconventional pentatonic scales. Johnny, who is a student of jazz and classical piano, cites Keith Jarrett as a hero, while his accordion playing draws from various world styles, including South African maskandi and Qawwali music.
Mother Mother
Mother Mother
Mother Mother has always reveled in contradiction.

"It's the person, the humanoid...that's the very good bad thing."

For Ryan Guldemond, there is no denying the human condition in all its tragic, conflicting nature.

Two years after the Juno-nominated "The Sticks," the band's apocalyptic 2012 album steeped in isolation and dread, the Vancouver quintet returns with its fifth studio album, "Very Good Bad Thing": an edgy, synth-heavy, club-driven rock record filled with massive hooks.

But as is the band's trademark, behind the gauzy boy-girl vocal harmonies, angular guitar lines and infectious rhythms lies something deeper and darker.

"I think it's peppier and more of a party, but at the same time the torture is very apparent," singer/keyboardist Jasmin Parkin says.

"But there's not a lot of denial," Guldemond says. "There's a pride behind the confession. No one's denying anything."

Human "malfunctions" are cause for celebration on "Very Good Bad Thing."

Mother Mother come out swinging on "Get Out The Way," a super-charged call to arms Guldemond describes as not letting anyone to get in the way of your truth, whatever your truth may be. "I know I'm supposed to integrate," he snarls, "but how's about instead I inch away?"

"F -- - yeah, I'm a deviant," Guldemond proclaims on the proggy "Reaper Man," which pounds its way through your cerebellum like the giant walking hammers from Pink Floyd's "The Wall."

No subject is taboo for Mother Mother on "Very Good Bad Thing": male body image ("I Go Hungry"), morning-after self-loathing ("Have It Out"), bullying and suicide ("Kept Down," inspired in part by the death of Amanda Todd).

"Am I to die alone and sublime?" Guldemond asks before ending the album as if it had all been an illusion -- with a vanishing trick. "You may just watch me disappear," he sings against the silence.

"As I get older I feel more in touch with my flaws as something I can integrate, as opposed to something I suppress in order to spin some yarn of perfection," Guldemond says. "Never have I been so at peace with the imperfect side of myself."

Recorded with Juno-winning producer Gavin Brown (Metric, Billy Talent, Tragically Hip) at his Noble Street studio in Toronto, "Very Good Bad Thing" is the next logical step in Mother Mother's sonic evolution.

This isn't the same Mother Mother that gave us the cheeky "Touch Up" (2007) and "O My Heart" (2008), or even the adventurous "Eureka" (2011). It's a much different band than on the conceptual "The Sticks" (2012), an album that made Mother Mother the second most-played artist on Canadian alternative radio in 2012 and 2013.

The guitar hooks are bigger, the synths are louder, the vocal harmonies are more carefully crafted and the irony toned down, and the bass and drums are tighter.

"I've been really getting into James Blake, Little Dragon and EDM in general," Guldemond says. "As the songs were coming in, they were wearing a skin of electronics. It's easy to demo from that place. In doing that you get attached to that personality and it begins to define the shape of the song. It just made sense to continue down that path as opposed to uprooting the core and starting from scratch.

"It feels natural. There's a lot of fire in the band and its sentiment, and that seems accentuated through big, modern, tough sounds."

"Very Good Bad Thing" certainly pops out of the package with a resounding snap.

For a band whose approach has been to modernize itself at every turn and has never really been able to fit neatly into a box, Brown was the right fit for the job.

"He really brought an edge to our sound," Parkin says. "We've never done the same thing twice. Every album is a new chapter and a new beginning."

Close to 10 years after it formed, Mother Mother is embracing its true nature. And it speaks volumes.

"No matter what you do you'll be criticized for it," Guldemond says. "So it's better to be criticized for taking risks rather than being safe."
Venue Information:
Aggie Theatre
204 South College Avenue
Fort Collins, CO, 80524
http://www.aggietheatre.com/