Joyner Lucas / Dizzy Wright: The 508 / Still Movin' Tour w/ Marlon Craft, Eli, Reezy and Special Guests

Joyner Lucas / Dizzy Wright: The 508 / Still Movin' Tour w/ Marlon Craft, Eli, Reezy and Special Guests

Sat, February 10, 2018

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

GA: $22 Advance / $25 Day Of Show /// Meet & Greet Packages: $75

This event is 16 and over

Joyner Lucas
Joyner Lucas
Joyner Lucas first captured national attention with the complex verbal gymnastics of 2014’s “Backwords,” followed in 2015 by his debut mixtape, “ALONG CAME JOYNER” and its extraordinary breakthrough single, “Ross Capicchioni.” The track – and its provocative companion visual – chronicles the true story of a Detroit gang shooting, told from the perspectives of both the teenage victim and the shooter himself. “Ross Capicchioni” drew widespread acclaim in throughout the hip-hop universe, with the legendary Busta Rhymes declaring himself so “amazed…I can’t even put it into words.” The epic video proved a viral sensation, with over 5.3 million streams at YouTube alone.

Lucas continued to make his bones with a memorable spot on the 2015 BET Hip-Hop Awards Cypher, collaborations alongside such like-minded artists as Jarren Benton, Locksmith, TechN9ne, and Logic, as well as a pair of remarkably strong singles, “Happy Birthday” and “I’m Sorry,” both of which saw him displaying astonishing lyrical skills and a striking social consciousness. “I’m Sorry” – included on “508-507-2209” – has proven Lucas’ biggest viral success thus far, now approaching 17 million individual views at YouTube alone. Today he continues to garner national attention, but this time it’s with his newest phenomenon, “I’m Not Racist” – in which highlights the brutal conversation on racism that no one wants to have. Within a week of its release the video has already been viewed over 9 million times & has received much praise from the likes of CNN, XXL, Complex, Huffington Post and more.

Born and raised in Worcester, Massachusetts, Lucas grew up in a biracial household, but he found the true color of life watching his father make music.

"I developed a sense of feeling and healing from watching him," he says of his father, who was a local soul music producer. "Eventually, I started bobbing my head and freestyling and he told me to start writing that stuff down."

His talent developed quickly as he wrote his first song at age 9 and completed his first album just one year later. By the time he entered high school, education had already taken a backseat to his musical aspirations. After spending most of his time writing lyrics instead of essays, Lucas graduated and wasted no time dropping his 2011 debut Listen To Me under his former moniker Future Joyner. The project garnered positive feedback which motivated Lucas to chase his dreams

"My music is purity," says Lucas. "I try to have a bit of everything. I can't please everybody, but I try to with my music. I am a musical guy, so I couldn't pigeon hole myself even if I tried."

Lucas' latest offering Along Came Joyner proves this. The conceptual album revolves around a story about a man from another planet who gets kicked out of home by his mother, lands on earth and begins a quest to find his human father. A story that isn't too far off from Lucas' real-life experiences.
Dizzy Wright
Dizzy Wright
“You just don’t become a leader in one year. You’re prepped for it. When you’re at your lowest—but you got that faith—that gives you motivation. And when you have that motivation, that’s what makes you a leader,” says Las Vegas native Dizzy Wright. Beyond his years at 22, Dizzy has been one of the first Sin City rappers to grab the spotlight and carry it across the globe.

“My mom kicked me out when I was 17,” Dizzy reveals of the woman who both raised him and managed his career since childhood, “I was thrown out into the world.” With a similar story to his inspiration, Tupac Shakur, he took to local clubs to build a network and fan-base by being both skilled and flashy. “I was all about getting people to know my name. I knew the vision, but I didn’t know the gesture. You’ve got to live through this to get an understanding of it.” Along the way, Wright says that life taught him to keep a tight circle and to be concerned with how his music sounded in venues just as much as the writing. That dichotomy of substance and swagger has made Dizzy Wright an independent charting sensation with three 2012 releases, SmokeOut Conversations (along with the 200,000 times downloaded promotional mixtape), as well as a follow-up EP, The First Agreement. In turn, the youngest member of Funk Volume has been one of the most active.

Although SmokeOut Conversations could be dismissed as just marijuana music, the inspiration behind the concept is deeply personal to Dizzy. The rapper asserts, “I didn’t want people to perceive me as this weed rapper with a weed album.” Instead, he admits that a key moment in creating the album came from his first encounter with his father. “I did a show in Detroit with Hopsin, and I got to meet my father for the first time. I was trying to figure out what he was gonna be like. He went to jail a couple months before I was born, and then he got out 20 years later.” To buffer the circumstances, Dizzy and his Pops eased tensions with some help. “When I finally met him, all we did was smoke and talk.” “We just got to do a lot of catchin’ up, lotta talkin’, and lotta smokin’.” After his father traveled to several dates with the Funk Volume family, Dizzy left the experience with a title and theme for his debut album.

The independent album produced two multimillion-view videos on YouTube, “Solo Dolo” and “Can’t Trust Em.” Dizzy was specific in giving his expanding base both sides of his repertoire. The first was Dizzy’s most personal record, while the second had, what he calls “that now-sound.” Both resonated, and the rapper was able to go from “doing shows to doing concerts” in his relentless touring with label-mates. Reflecting, he notes, “I was just testing the waters.” Ready to fully jump in, Wright promises of his forthcoming work, “My next album will be the biggest one to date. It’ll be the perfect material for the fans, ‘cause I understand everything a lot more.”

Like his idol, Dizzy Wright embodies a do-for-self journey that’s magnetized listeners with his natural charisma. Perhaps with a cloudy chorus or a bassline to make it digestible, he’s leading a new charge. “’Pac’s passion gives me passion. I don’t wanna be just one of these niggas just talkin’.” In life and in music, already he’s saying much more.
Marlon Craft
Marlon Craft
Marlon Craft is a rapper and artist from New York City. Born in Hell's Kitchen, son of a jazz musician, Craft's rise is defined by musical variance and New York realism. Fitting hard-hitting social commentary into a diverse set of sounds, Craft's vocal pace matches and enhances mixes of live instrumentation with boom-bap drums at electronic intervals.

It is this contemporary relevancy paired with a deep respect for the history and culture of hip-hop (and its web of influences) that attracted a world-wide fan-base, and a break-out The Tunnel's End debut project, earning #2 on the iTunes hip-hop charts and #8 across all genres in its first week.

At once enigmatic and authentic, with sold out shows and a series of EPs to be released in early 2018, Craft's ascendance is well on its way.
Venue Information:
Aggie Theatre
204 South College Avenue
Fort Collins, CO, 80524
http://www.aggietheatre.com/